Academic Staff

Martin R. Albrecht is a professor in the Information Security Group and the director of the Cryptography Group.

His research is focused on all aspects of cryptography from the hard mathematical problems underlying it to the cryptanalysis of deployed cryptographic protocols and implementations. His recent work focuses on lattice-based and post-quantum cryptography, block ciphers for algebraic platforms and attacks on cryptographic protocols. He is also a contributor to the Sage Mathematics Software and many other open-source projects.

Martin studied Computer Science at Universität Bremen in Germany before coming to Royal Holloway to earn his PhD under the supervision of Carlos Cid. After completing his PhD he took a postdoc position at LIP6 in Paris in the POLSYS group of Jean-Charles Faugère and then moved to DTU in Copenhagen to join the team of Lars Knudsen. He came back to Royal Holloway for a postdoc position with Kenny Paterson before becoming a lecturer in the Information Security Group. His Erdős–Bacon number is 6. He/him or they/them.

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Simon Blackburn is a professor in the Maths Department. He studies algebra, combinatorics, cryptography, and the connections between these subjects. He is interested in the cryptanalysis of post-quantum schemes.

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Carlos Cid is a professor in the Information Security Group at Royal Holloway University of London. He is also a visiting research professor at Simula UiB, Norway.

Carlos’ research has traditionally focused on applying algebraic techniques to symmetric- and public-key cryptanalysis. More recently he has also been working on post-quantum cryptography and secure computation. In addition he has an interest in applications of economics to cyber security. Carlos (and Martin) are part of the submission team of Classic McEliece (following its merge with NTS-KEM), a code-based cryptographic scheme selected as a finalist to NIST’s Post-Quantum Cryptography Standardization Project. He previously served in the selection committees of the CAESAR and eSTREAM cryptographic competitions, and was the general and programme co-chair of FSE 2014, held in London, and SAC 2018 in Calgary.

Carlos holds a BSc and PhD in Mathematics from Universidade de Brasília (1994, 1999). He was a post-doctoral researcher at RWTH-Aachen (2000-2001), and worked as a software engineer in a start-up in Dublin (2001-2003), before joining Royal Holloway in Oct 2003.

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Keith M. Martin is a professor of information security at Royal Holloway, University of London and director of the EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Cyber Security for the Everyday.

He has broad research interests, with a focus on applications of cryptography, and geopolitical aspects of cryptography and cyber security. He is also keen on communicating about cryptography to wider audiences. He is author of the textbook Everyday Cryptography (OUP, 2012), now in its second edition, which introduces cryptography to non-mathematical audiences. He is also author of the popular science book Cryptography: The Key to Digital Security, How it Works and Why it Matters (Norton, 2020).

Keith holds a degree in Mathematics from the University of Glasgow and a PhD from Royal Holloway. Following research positions at the University of Adelaide and the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Keith returned to Royal Holloway in 2000 and served as Director of the Information Security Group from 2010 to 2015.

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Chris J Mitchell received his BSc and PhD degrees in Mathematics from Westfield College, University of London in 1975 and 1979 respectively. He was appointed as Professor of Computer Science at Royal Holloway in 1990, having previously worked at Racal Comsec, Salisbury, UK (1979-85) and Hewlett-Packard Laboratories, Bristol, UK (1985-90). After joining Royal Holloway he co-founded the Information Security Group in 1990, and helped launch the MSc in Information Security in 1992. His research interests span information security, focusing on applications of cryptography, and combinatorial mathematics. He is co-editor-in-chief of Designs, Codes and Cryptography, and section editor for Section D of The Computer Journal. He has been actively involved in information security standardisation for more than 30 years, and has acted as editor for over 20 ISO/IEC standards; in 2010 he was a recipient of the IEC 1906 Award, recognising an exceptional contribution to the work of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC).

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Sean Murphy is a professor in the School of Mathematics and Information Security at Royal Holloway (University of London). His academic research concentrates on mathematical cryptology. He was a leader of the NESSIE project, a European project to assess cryptographic primitives for future possible standardisation. He was also a member of the committee which set up ECRYPT project, a European Network of Excellence in Cryptology consiting of 35 European organisations working in cryptology.

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Siaw-Lynn Ng is a senior lecturer in the Information Security Group. Her research interest lies in combinatorics and finite geometry and their applications in information security. Recent work includes research into the properties of privacy and resilience in distributed storage codes, anonymity in peer-to-peer reputation systems, and security in swarm robotics.

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Rachel Player is a lecturer in the Department of Information Security and in 2020-2021 is a visiting researcher at The Alan Turing Institute. Previously, she was a postdoctoral researcher at Royal Holloway. Before that, she was a visiting researcher and a postdoctoral researcher in the PolSys team of LIP6 at Sorbonne Université in Paris. She obtained her PhD from Royal Holloway in 2018.

Rachel’s main research interests are in post-quantum cryptography, especially in the design and cryptanalysis of lattice-based cryptographic schemes. Rachel is interested in Privacy Enhancing Technologies and she has worked extensively in the area of applied homomorphic encryption. Recently, Rachel has been interested in the application of quantum algorithms in cryptanalysis.

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Elizabeth Quaglia is a senior lecturer in the Information Security Group.

Her research focusses on public-key cryptography, including identity-based and attribute-based encryption, digital signatures and key exchange protocols. More recently, she has specialised in privacy notions for advanced protocols such as e-voting and the security of blockchain technologies.

Elizabeth studied Mathematics at Universita degli Studi di Torino in Italy before coming to Royal Holloway for her MSc in Mathematics of Cryptography and Communications, and her PhD under the supervision of Kenny Paterson. She was a postdoc in the crypto team at ENS Ulm in Paris, and became visiting lecturer in the Computer Science Department at University of Cape Coast, Ghana, in partnership with Academics Without Borders. She then joined the Huawei France Research Center in Paris, as senior research scientist, for two years. She came back to Royal Holloway as a lecturer in the Information Security Group.

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Postdoctoral Researchers

Daniel Gardham is a postdoctoral researcher in the Cryptography Group. His research interests are in developing cryptographic protocols for use in privacy enhancing technologies. He has experience in designing protocols and provable security. More recently, the focus has been on post-quantum schemes, namely from lattice-based assumptions.

Previously, he was a PhD student at the Surrey Centre for Cyber Security, and before that, he obtained a Masters in Mathematics (MMath) from the University of Bath.

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Jianwei Li is a Research Fellow in the Information Security Group under the supervision of Prof. Martin R. Albrecht.

His research interests involve the Geometry of Numbers, lattice algorithms and their applications in cryptanalysis, lattice-based cryptography (inlcuding LWE and NTRU), complexity theory of hard lattice problems.

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Yixin Shen is a postdoctoral researcher in the Information Security Group. Previously she completed her PhD at Université de Paris under the supervision of Frédéric Magniez. Before that, she received her BSc and MSc in Mathematics and Computer Science at Ecole Polytechnique in France.

Yixin’s main research interests are in quantum algorithms and their application in lattice-based cryptanalysis. She has worked extensively on classical and quantum algorithms for the shortest vector problem using enumeration and discrete Gaussian based sieving.

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PhD Students

Marcel Armour completed a BSc and MSc in Maths prior to joining the CDT. He is interested in symmetric cryptography, privacy and anonymity.

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Erin Hales studied maths at the University of Manchester and did an MSc in Maths and Foundations of Computer Science at the University of Oxford before joining the CDT. She is interested in post-quantum cryptography.

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Jodie Knapp completed a BSc (Hons) in Mathematics at King’s College London in 2017. Previously she have researched secret sharing schemes in the game theory setting and homomorphic time-lock puzzles. Currently, she is researching Updateable and Time-Release Encryption Schemes.

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Angelique Faye Loe completed a BSc Hons in Mathematics at the Open University and an MSc in Mathematics of Cryptography and Communications at Royal Holloway. Angelique’s primary research interest is cryptography.

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Lenka Mareková completed a BSc (Hons) in Computer Science & Mathematics at the University of Edinburgh prior to joining the CDT. Her research interests are centered around applied cryptography and analysis of real-world protocols, with a focus on messaging protocols.

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Liam Medley completed an integrated masters degree in Mathematics at the University of York before joining the CDT. He is interested in cryptographic primitives, protocol security and security in distributed ledger technology.

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Simon-Philipp Merz is a PhD Researcher within the Cyber Security Centre for Doctoral Studies at Royal Holloway, University of London. Prior to joining the CDT, Simon completed a BSc in Mathematics at the Free University of Berlin and graduated from both the MSc in Pure Mathematics at Imperial College London and the MSc in Mathematics and Foundations of Computer Science at the University of Oxford. His research revolves around post-quantum cryptography and cryptanalysis with a special focus on isogeny-based cryptography. More generally, Simon is interested in computational number theory and various applications of pure mathematics to cryptography.

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Tabitha Ogilvie is a PhD student in the Information Security Group, studying as part of the CDT in Cybersecurity for the Everyday. Her research is centred around applied homomorphic encryption, particularly considering how machine learning computation can be outsourced to the cloud without compromising the privacy of the underlying data. She is also interested in other aspects of privacy preserving machine learning, adversarial machine learning, and, more broadly, the links between cryptography and machine learning.

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Jeroen Pijnenburg completed his bachelor’s degree in Mathematics cum laude at Radboud University Nijmegen and his bachelor’s degree in Econometrics & Operations Research cum laude at Tilburg University. He continued his studies in Industrial & Applied Mathematics and completed his master’s degree cum laude at Eindhoven University of Technology. His research interests are post-quantum cryptography and he has worked on lattice-based cryptography for his master’s thesis at the University of Auckland.

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Eamonn Postlethwaite studied for four years at Imperial College London and received an MSci in Mathematics with First Class (Honours).

Since joining the CDT in September of 2016 he has studied lattice sieves and the practical aspects of lattice based cryptanalysis, with a focus on lattice reduction algorithms and their simulation. He has also spent some time designing quantum algorithms that give time memory tradeoffs for these tasks.

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Colin Putman graduated from the Open University in 2016 with a joint-honours bachelor’s degree in Computer Science and Mathematics. Colin then went on to complete a master’s degree in Information Security at Royal Holloway, graduating in 2018, before joining the CDT program. Colin’s research interests are cryptography, protocol design and the security of online gaming.

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Wrenna Robson has had an eclectic education and career history before joining the CDT, from teaching in schools to microprocessor architecture documentation. Her background is originally in mathematics, with a BA from the University of Cambridge and a research MSc from the University of Bristol focusing on the properties of the torsion points of elliptic curves. She is interested in all areas of cyber security, but is particularly excited to learn more about cryptography and the geopolitics of cyber security.

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Joe Rowell studied Computer Science at Royal Holloway before joining the CDT in 2018. His research interests primarily cover algorithms for the shortest vector problem and their implementations, with a particular emphasis on efficiency. However, Joe would categorise himself as an aspiring “latticestician”, and thus is interested in all aspects of lattice-based cryptography. You can find any open-source code that Joe has written here.

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Past Members

  • Mike Burmester
  • Alex Dent
  • Steven Galbraith
  • Dieter Gollmann
  • Kenny Paterson
  • Fred Piper
  • Bertram Poettering
  • Peter Wild